Posted on: in Linux, Ubuntu, Web development

When working with a git repository you need to know which branch you are committing to. To do that you type git status and check for the info. Sometimes you just need to know the branch in order not to make mistakes when merging. It is super useful to have branch name as part of the command prompt.

Posted on: in Linux, Ubuntu, Web development, WordPress

For years, Net Beans has been my IDE of choice. Although some may argue that it is not the best IDE for web development, I would say that it is the best balanced one.

These are the main reasons that should be taken into account when deciding if NetBeans will be your IDE of choice.

Posted on: in Linux, Ubuntu, Web development

In August 2014 Google announced that their search engine will value HTTPS as a ranking signal. This is quite a good news for end-users meaning that they will get more secure sites in top search results. However, it’s not a very good news for owners of small or unprofitable websites, since they would have to acquire signed certificate to get their website a ranking boost.

Posted on: in Linux, Ubuntu, Web development

Unix shell is one of the most powerful tools ever created, but sometimes it can be quite dull. Adding it a bit more spice could make your day brighter and your thoughts clearer.

This can be done by setting the LS_COLORS environment variable. Best way to do it is in $HOME/.bashrc file. If done like this, color settings will be loaded each time you start your terminal.

Posted on: in Linux, Web development

There is a quick and convenient way to convert PDF to one or more images. Command line tool ImageMagick does that (and a lot more). You can convert an entire PDF document to a single image, or, if you like, there is an option to output pages as a series of enumerated image files.

Posted on: in Linux, Ubuntu

If you are (as I am) annoyed by the default setting of Sunday as first day of the week, there’s an easy fix for that. Following will set Monday as first day of the week on your gnome-based system.

Posted on: in Linux, Ubuntu

Few days ago I upgraded my Ubuntu installation to the new release. The upgrade went really smooth and effortless – it required only 3 or 4 clicks during the install, mainly weather to keep or replace my old configuration files.